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indonesia and what rights does an american jew, gay or woman in chile and syria? what obligations we have to the french nation to suggest we are citizens of the world destroys our understanding of the term and weakens us at the performance of the duties of the citizen. one might say that the american power was the 1969 moon landing, and since then, we'll be successful the empire in history according to the greatest access to prosperity, happiness and public life and history have been on the decline. this decline has given as inevitable. nothing lasts forever. this period of diminishing american hegemony, however, may be one of calfee age. we are the owners of the country and its board of directors, and we may find the strength to reasonably consider the options open to us in this confusing time, none of them is perfect. and this is a time we must make a moral choice which is to say a choice between the two flawed or bad alternatives. if we do not choose, the choice will be made for us by those uninterested at home and abroad by weakening the power of the american electorate. it's not a br
in september. the late anthony shadid has been nominated. he died in syria while covering syria for the washington post. his wife will be here representing him, and that's nada bachary. katherine boo has been nominated, "behind the beautiful forever," about mumbai, and anne applebaum has a book out and is scheduled on our q & a show in september. so we'll be interviewing those authors as we go. we'll be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their picture taken. right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation, and this is david steinberger. mr. steinbergers is also head of the become group what is the national book airport. >> given to the best american books in four categories, fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and young people's literature, and you look at the people who have won this award, it's the pan of pantheons. saul bell wyoming. >> this began 63 years ago. do you know the history, why it began? >> it was group of people who were interested in making sure that great books had the greatest possible impact on the culture, and that's
the civil war in syria. he grew up in oklahoma, of all places, an american-lebanese family. he ended up fascinated by the middle east, became a reporter, and the life mission was to try to explain this region to americans, which is no easy thing to do. he covered his -- more than his share of wars issue and in the course of that, sort of his first marriage fell apart because he was always overseas covering the war. he ends up buying his family's old ramshackled house somewhere in lebanon. i forget the name of the village, and takes a year off to restore the house. it sounds like a movie, almost, which he does with great difficulty. the book, his memoir, blends in both lebanese history, and it's glorious past, which is sadly been destroyed through civil war, as well as his own personal story so we sort of -- it was -- shortly before the book came out, he died. he was no more than 40 or 45. >> host: sarah weinman? >> guest: well, i feel like in looking at this list, i feel an unmitigated surge to talk about how much i adored the katherine book and i made a joke on twitter that if her book
in syria. his book is a memoir. he grew up in oklahoma full places, and american lebanese family. became a reporter and his life mission was to try to explain, which is no easy thing to do. he covered more than an issue for in the course of the first marriage and death buying the family's old ramshackle house somewhere in lebanon. i forget the name of the village and takes a year off to restore the movie almost, which he does with great difficulty. the book, his memoir blends in both lebanese history and its glorious past, which is sadly destroyed or civil war as voices of personal story. so shortly before the book came out, he died. he missed about 40, 45. >> host: sarah weinman. >> guest: well, i feel looking at this list, and unmitigated searcher talk about how much i adore the book. i made a comment on twitter just kathryn booze did every single best of 2012 book it would be fine with me. it's a phenomenal piece of report it, but literature which he writes with a tremendous sense of empathy. she's a new yorker staff writer and previous recipient of the macarthur genius grant. her hus
of apparently related to an asthma attack while covering the war in syria. his book is a memoir, he grew up in oklahoma of all places, an american lebanese family, ended up fascinated by the middle east, became a reporter, his life mission was to try to explain this region to america which is no easy thing to do. he covered more than his share of wars and in the course of that, his first marriage fell apart because he was always overseas covering the war. the ends up buying his family's old ramshackle house somewhere in lebanon and takes a year off to restore the house. sounds like a movie almost which he does with great difficulty. his memoir blends in both lebanese history and its glorious past which was sadly destroyed through civil war as well as starting. shortly before the book came out he died. she must have been 40 or so, 45. >> sarah weinman. >> i feel like in looking at this list i feel unmitigated surge to talk about how i enjoy it the capt. book, if catherine booth's book made every best of 2012 list that would be fine by me. it is a phenomenal piece not only of reporting but li
an american jew, gay or a woman, enjoy in syria? to suggest we're citizens of the world destroys our understanding of the term and so weakens our performance of the duties of a citizen. one might say that the ap to gee of american power was the 1969 moon landing, and since then we have been in a decline. this decline is inevitable, nothing lasts forever. this period of diminishing american he generalny, however, may be one of healthy age. we citizens are the owners of of this country and its board of directors, and we may find the strength to reasonably consider the options open to us in this confusing time. one of them is perfect. and this is a sign we must make a moral choice which is to say a choice between two flawed or, indeed, bad alternatives. if we do not choose, the choice will be made for us by those interested at home and aprod and weakening the power of the american electorate. it's not a brave announcement, but it is our country to govern, to defend and to enjoy as long as we choose to set our minds to it. thank you. [applause] >> i think we're going to have a few questi
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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